laboratory

Reporting Laboratory Injuries to OSHA

Operational-OSHA requires employers to track certain work place injuries such as splashes or needle sticks on OSHA 300 series logs. Currently these logs are kept on site and not sent to OSHA unless requested. Beginning January 2017, OSHA will require electronic submission of these forms annually. Employers with greater than 250 employees will submit form 300, 300A and 301. Employers with less staff will only need to submit form 300A. The injury data could be posted to the OSHA website.

Edition 10: Inventory Control

laboratory professionals services elitech

Monitoring laboratory reagents and supplies is an important aspect of maintaining an efficient laboratory. Lapses in available reagents and supplies can cause delayed test results. There are also increased costs due to expedited shipping charges. Cost savings can be realized by consolidating orders and cutting down the number of orders that have to be shipped in a given month.  Delays in testing can create sample integrity problems for tests that have limited stability. Revenue can also be lost if samples need to be sent to a reference lab and are not able to be billed.   For all these reasons Total Lab Care has put together a Materials Management policy and procedure that you might find helpful to control your laboratories inventory.

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Edition 10: Inventory Control

Monitoring laboratory reagents and supplies is an important aspect of maintaining an efficient laboratory. Lapses in available reagents and supplies can cause delayed test results. There are also increased costs due to expedited shipping charges. Cost savings can be realized by consolidating orders and cutting down the number of orders that have to be shipped in a given month.  Delays in testing can create sample integrity problems for tests that have limited stability. Revenue can also be lost if samples need to be sent to a reference lab and are not able to be billed.   For all these reasons Total Lab Care has put together a Materials Management policy and procedure that you might find helpful to control your laboratories inventory…(Read More Here)

The 2015 MLO annual salary survey

That’s the message the clinical lab got this past year, either explicitly or by implication—and come to think of it, it’s the same one lab directors have been hearing for a while. Belt-tightening has been the order of the day, and will continue to be.

But so are exciting new assays and approaches, new possibilities in automation, the continuing emergence of molecular diagnostics and personalized medicine, and new quality assurance, reimbursement, and regulatory models that present opportunities as well as challenges for the clinical lab. It is an exciting time for the industry, one of increasing professionalism and vitality. The 2015 MLO salary survey presents a snapshot of that time, and of the current state of the clinical lab. Like all snapshots, it has limitations, but it captures a moment, providing a picture of the realities of the laboratory profession today and of trends that can be clearly observed and, perhaps, seen coming from a distance.

The average salary as reported by the 2015 survey is $80,985. This represents an increase from the 2014 reported average of $71,086. The average salary of a female in the industry is $75,535, which is 21,004 less than the average male compensation of $96,539.  Just over 69 percent of survey respondents are lab professionals in a hospital lab setting. The largest number of respondents (28.9%) are associated with laboratories with ten or fewer employees, followed by 24.8% who work in labs that employ between 21 and 50…  (Read More Here)

lab-ask laboratory professionals salary survey by MLO

Source of the image: MLO

Transition from EQC to IQCP: What it means to Physician Office Laboratories

On January 1, 2014, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) implemented a new alternative Quality Control (QC) option for non-waived laboratory testing. CLIA laboratories can now begin to voluntarily transition away from Equivalent Quality Control (EQC) and begin using either the default CLIA Quality Control (QC) requirement, or the new option called the Individualized Quality Control Plan (IQCP). Physician Office Laboratories (POLs) will now have to determine if IQCP is the right choice for them.

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