Bacteria

Hand Hygiene Compliance

Advance for Laboratories – Bacteria are found on everything we touch-a fact that, unfortunately, is forgotten far too often because we can’t see them. So, what would happen if people were shown magnified images of the actual bacteria they encounter on a daily basis?

This is exactly what infection prevention and control specialists Ashley Gregory and Eman Chami did in a study at Henry Ford Hospital in Detroit. Like many hospitals across the country, Henry Ford incorporates hand hygiene as a routine, daily practice and uses continuing education to remind healthcare workers of the importance of cleansing their hands both before and after interacting with patients.

“Hand hygiene is important because it is the simplest thing that can be done to help prevent infection,” Gregory said. “It’s something that we all do within our every day, but I don’t think people realize the complexity of it in healthcare. Therefore, it lends itself to increased infection rates within hospitals and can also lend itself to bringing home illnesses that workers might not realize they’ve been carrying on them.”(Read More)

How to stop superbugs from killing 10 million people a year

(CNN) Superbugs could kill one person every three seconds by 2050, the equivalent of 10 million people a year, according to the final report last week from the Review on Antimicrobial Resistance, established in 2014 to keep the world from being “cast back into the dark ages of medicine.”

The authors highlight the increasing burden of resistance and call for greater awareness of the problem, including the need for public campaigns beginning as soon as this summer. (Read More)

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Common bacteria on verge of becoming antibiotic-resistant superbugs

Antibiotic resistance is poised to spread globally among bacteria frequently implicated in respiratory and urinary infections in hospital settings, according to new research at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis.

The study shows that two genes that confer resistance against a particularly strong class of antibiotics can be shared easily among a family of bacteria responsible for a significant portion of hospital-associated infections.

Drug-resistant germs in the same family of bacteria recently infected several patients at two Los Angeles hospitals. The infections have been linked to medical scopes believed to have been contaminated with bacteria that can resist carbapenems, potent antibiotics that are supposed to be used only in gravely ill patients or those infected by resistant bacteria. “Carbapenems are one of our last resorts for treating bacterial infections, what we use when nothing else works,” said senior author Gautam Dantas, PhD, associate professor of pathology and immunology…(Read More Here)