Discarding Inoperable Instrumentation

Operational- When discarding lab instrumentation that becomes inoperable you must take into account local disposal requirements for biohazard materials. The analyzer must be decontaminated per the manufacturers guidelines and any sharp objects or parts removed. Once this step has been completed, contact your local biohazard waste disposal facility to see if the instrument can be placed in a dumpster or if there are other disposal requirements.

 

Quest Diagnostics Moves to Convenient Nonfasting Cholesterol Testing with Improved Method for Assessing Heart Disease Risk and Aiding Treatment Decisions

Quest – SECAUCUS, N.J.Sept. 7, 2017 /PRNewswire/ — Quest Diagnostics (NYSE: DGX), the world’s leading provider of diagnostic information services, today announced that all of the company’s cholesterol test services that involve estimates of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) now use a novel calculation shown to improve the accuracy of testing for levels of LDL-C, a key marker of risk of cardiovascular disease. (Read More)

Training Millennials

Advance for the Laboratory – May 2, 2016:  “What are the most effective ways to train millennials?” It’s probably the question that training professionals hear more often than any other today. For training professionals born before 1980-the year when the first millennials were born-that question can seem mysterious and complex. We look at millennials and see a group of young people who seem addicted to texting, who sometimes seem skeptical about the lessons we want to teach them and who are prone to changing jobs frequently.(Read More)

F.D.A. Warns of Faulty Lead Testing in Children and Mothers

The New York Times May 17, 2017: Some blood tests used to check for lead poisoning in children and women since 2014 may have wrongly indicated that children were safe from lead exposure, federal health officials warned Wednesday. Children under 6 and pregnant and nursing women may need to be retested. The concern is that the original tests may have underestimated blood lead levels, providing false assurance to parents. Infants and young children are especially vulnerable to the effects of lead poisoning, which can cause cognitive deficits and affect almost every system in the body. (Read More)

Keeping clinical lab errors to a minimum

MLO May 23, 2017: Today’s healthcare climate challenges the clinical laboratory to offer improved patient care while reducing costs and increasing efficiency. There is no room for error, however small. Seventy percent of all medical decisions are made based on high-volume laboratory testing and the corresponding results.1 Critical information in the clinical laboratory directly impacts patient care and must be delivered with excellence. (Read More)